Author Archive for TCTacoma

The Transportation Club of Tacoma invites you to attend the Holiday Luncheon and Auction benefiting the Emergency Food Network. 

Please contact Lori Kincannon (253-326-1292) or Michele McDonald (253-414-1356) for Silent Auction, Live Auction or Drawing Donations.

Registration & Event Information:
  • Emerald Queen Casino Ballroom & Conference Center
    5580 Pacific Hwy East, Fife, WA 98424
    (The Ballroom & Conference Center is located West of the Casino across the parking lot)
  • 11:00 am  Registration/networking
  • 11:45 am  Lunch served
  • 2:00 pm  Event conclusion
  • Cost  $35 prepaid, drawing is an additional $25 for 6 tickets
    ** Additional $15 for walk-in members and non-members
  • Register Online or by email

 

Contributions or gifts to the Transportation Club of Tacoma are not tax deductible as charitable contributions.

 


Emergency Food Network – Working to End Hunger in Pierce County since 1982

Each December our club holds the Emergency Food Network Food Drive and Fundraiser at our Christmas luncheon. All proceeds from the event go to EFN who’ll use the proceeds to feed local people in our community. The event includes a visit from the local high school choir and speakers who bring in the Christmas spirit by helping auction off great gifts for the membership. This past December we raised more than $34,000. What’s even more incredible is how much food we can expect our efforts will produce. Currently, EFN is able to convert every $1 raised into $12 worth of food. This means that we were able to bring in $386,000 worth of food to the people in our community. Our membership is thrilled they can have such a huge impact in our community.

Since 1999, we have been able to raise over 1 million dollars in food for EFN. Come join us at our December luncheon where we’ll once again bring you a little Christmas joy and goodwill to the people in our community.

By Greg Mowat – Principal/Owner –  GTM Transformations LLC (SDVOB)    

I have always been aware of Veterans Day in early November – As a youngster visiting my maternal Grandparents before Thanksgiving I remember my Grandma helping the American Legion Post 154 (Ferndale, WA) Lady’s Auxiliary prepare poppies to be distributed in memory of those who fought in WWI (my grandfather was a veteran of the “Big War”). My Father is a veteran of WWII serving in the European theater from D Day to the occupation of Germany – Returning home shortly before the armistice with Japan, concerned as he did not have enough “points” to prevent possible re-deployment to the Pacific. The surrender in the Pacific ended his brief, though eventful, military career.

He had hoped that WWII would be the end of our Family’s contribution to military service, making his “war stories” the last to be shared around the table after large holiday dinners. He had friends who served in Korea, some of whom did not return much to his sadness. I was the oldest child in the immediate family and brother to two sisters; Dad opined that he was glad that I would be spared his experience on the battle field and the loss of those that one grows close to because of shared experience during training and warfare. Such would not be the case – I graduated from High School in the summer of 1967, attended community college through December of that year, relinquished a 2s deferment in January of 1968 and was in the United States Army on August 19th, 1968. I joined via enlistment, my longest duty station was Phu Loi, South Vietnam – August of 1969 to September of 1971 – with the 128th Assault Helicopter Co.

I am fond of telling friends and acquaintances that my military service was short, but eventful – I came away with a refined understanding of friendship, an experienced grasp of pragmatic leadership (I spent my last year in Vietnam as the NCOIC of the 128th’s avionics shop), and a respect for public/national service as the core of our national community. Many would have you believe that military service is about action, honor, valor, sacrifice, and heroism – All of that is true at a certain level and needs to be appreciated; I believe that there is a deeper, more profound level at which military service is about love, fulfillment, learning, growing and at the core, about cooperation, collaboration, and securing our shared community of friends, family, and those we love.

I have no problem with the Veteran Day sales, advertising with the flag in the background (or foreground as the case may be), and much of the general hype which accompanies the holiday activities in our commercial culture – It is all part of what I and the previous veterans, current veterans, and future veterans commit to protect as we accept the oath to the constitution upon entering the service. For the same reason, I am reasonably neutral regarding the back and forth around the flag and national anthem – I served to ensure that the freedom to honor same of not would be preserved. To curb any of this, no matter how we may individually feel, fly’s in the face of our service and the sacrifice of our comrades. Finally, I appreciate being recognized for my service, having said that, I am most honored by a rewarding career, secure community, and safe family – I matured, learned, developed, and blossomed in the U.S. Army: receiving decent work and career fulfillment is the best Thanks!

Our current 21st century veterans are amongst the best trained, best educated, highest achieving ever. I would be most thankful to my fellow Transportation Club of Tacoma colleagues for every effort that they are able to pursue to reach out to these superb women and men who have served our nation and provide opportunities for these veterans to transition successfully to civilian careers, joining the national community that their service ensured. I would further argue that all of us need to “pay forward” to these individuals to ensure that future generations of young women and men can feel secure in the knowledge that military service is a life-enhancing activity that is recognized a “plus” for future civilian career success. Anything less than that would be a tragedy for these future veterans and for our collective future.

In closing –Mark Twain said, “I am glad I did it, partly because it was well worth it, and chiefly because I shall never have to do it again.” There is certainly much of this sentiment in any reflection on military service; as the Master Sargent who recruited me into the U.S. Army put it “The army is a situation of mind over matter, they don’t mind, and you don’t matter” – I shall carry my military service close to my heart, and extend the empathy it bestowed on me to my fellow veterans and fellow citizens. I believe that all of us who have had the experience are better for the experience and need to connect that experience and its lessons to our daily life. Many Thanks to the Club for inviting my comments!

Greg Mowat – Principal/Owner –  GTM Transformations LLC (SDVOB)

Major General Bret D. Daugherty | Washington National Guard


11/13/17 UPDATE: 


Major General Bret D. Daugherty was appointed as the Adjutant General of Washington on July 28th, 2012. As the Adjutant General, he is commander of all Washington Army and Air National Guard forces and Director of the State’s Emergency Management and Enhanced 911 programs. General Daugherty also serves as Homeland Security Advisor to the Governor of Washington and as State Administrative Agent for all United States Department of Homeland Security grants awarded to Washington’s state, local, tribal and non-profit agencies and organizations.

General Daugherty attended Seattle University where he was awarded an Army Reserve Officers’ Training Corps scholarship. Upon graduating as a Distinguished Military Graduate in June of 1980, he was commissioned as a Regular Army Second Lieutenant. He left active duty in 1989 and joined the Washington Army National Guard in 1990.

AWARDS AND DECORATIONS:

  • Legion of Merit
  • Meritorious Service Medal (with 3 Bronze Oak Leaf Clusters) Army Commendation Medal (with 1 Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster) Army Achievement Medal (with 2 Bronze Oak Leaf Clusters)
  • Army Reserve Component Achievement Medal (with 3 Bronze Oak Leaf Clusters) National Defense Service Medal (with 1 Bronze Service Star)
  • Global War on Terrorism Service Medal
  • Humanitarian Service Medal
  • Armed Forces Reserve Medal (with Silver Hourglass, “M” Device, and numeral 2) Army Service Ribbon
  • Army Reserve Component Overseas Training Ribbon
  • Washington National Guard Commendation Medal
  • Washington State Emergency Service Medal (with 4 Bronze Oak Leaf Clusters) National Guard Service Ribbon
  • Senior Army Aviator Badge
  • Parachutist Badge

See General Daugherty’s full bio for more information.

 

Registration & Event Information:

The TCT meets September through June on the second Monday of every month for networking, lunch and dynamic speakers on important issues to the transportation industry. Members, their guests and others are invited.

Upcoming luncheon meetings:

  • December 11th – EFN Holiday Event
Have a credit card on file? Email us that you’re planning to attend!
THANK YOU to all who contributed door prizes at our last meeting! All proceeds go toward TCT’s Scholarship Program.

NOTE: October is National Cybersecurity Awareness Month.

If you’re not convinced that cyberattacks pose a real threat to your business and industry, then you’re not keeping up with current events. Consider these recent news headlines:

  • Equifax CEO departs, forgoes bonus after massive data breach
  • Feds tell state officials Russians tried to hack elections
  • Industry reactions to the Deloitte cyber attack

And cyberattacks are also becoming a growing threat in the shipping and transportation industry.

For example, in June, Maersk Line was the victim of a cyberattack, preventing it from accepting new orders.When the attack began, Maersk decided to take down a number of systems as a precaution. Due to limited access to some of its computer systems, Maersk, which handles one out of seven containers shipped worldwide, also had problems processing orders.

Maersk estimates that the bottom line damage done by the cyberattack was about $300 million. You can find out more about the cyberattack by watching this CNN interview with Vincent Clerc, Maersk’s chief commercial officer.

Since the attack, Maersk has taken a number of steps to improve its cybersecurity, and other shipping lines are taking additional steps to increase their data security.

For example, COSCO Shipping’s initial security efforts were to separate its centralized servers into individual servers limiting the risk for a system-wide compromise. More long-term, COSCO Shipping has established a strategic partnership with China Electronic Technology Cyber Security Co., Ltd. (China Cyber Security) aimed at establishing overall security of its customers and terminals.

During National Cybersecurity Awareness Month, many companies are running special efforts to educate their employees about ways they can help protect themselves and their company against the many cyber threats we face today.

Here are some simple tips to stay more secure and help prevent hacks and cyberattacks:

  1. Read and abide by your company’s Internet use policy.
  2. Make your passwords complex. Use a combination of numbers, symbols, and letters (uppercase and lowercase).
  3. Change your passwords regularly (every 45 to 90 days).
  4. Don’t share any of your user names, passwords, or other computer or website access codes.
  5. Only open emails or attachments from people you know.
  6. Never install or connect any personal software or hardware to your organization’s network or hardware without permission from your IT department.
  7. Make electronic and physical back-ups or copies of all your most important work.
  8. Report all suspicious or unusual problems with your computer to your IT department.

You can find additional cybersecurity publications on the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s website.

Mapping Global Cyber Threats: Attempts at cyber attacks occur 24/7 around the globe. You can watch some of these attempts in real-time here.

If you would like to share the steps your company is taking to handle cyber threats, please post them on TCT’s Facebook page.

 

Tom Pierson | Pierce County Chamber President & CEO

October 10th Update: Here is the link for the information about South Sound Summit that Tom spoke about yesterday:

http://www.tacomachamber.org/events/details/2017-south-sound-summit-7609

Transportation Club members can use the discount code “S3PARTNER” to save $50 on individual tickets however the more tickets a company buys, the greater the savings.


October 9th Update: The pledge form Tom Pierson discussed during his speech:

https://www.placeforjobs.com/take-action/


Utilizing his B.A. in political science from Washington State University, Tom Pierson has been President & CEO of the Tacoma-Pierce County Chamber (TPCC) since June 2011. Under Pierson’s leadership, the Chamber has strengthened and built countywide ties with leaders of the community. His commitment is to ensure and increase awareness that the Chamber is the voice for business.

Since his arrival, Pierson has spearheaded positive changes that are having a tangible impact. Building a strong leadership team was his first priority in addition to constructing a team of experts that can support and engage members at an appropriate level.

To resource members, community & business leaders, and key decision makers that influence the health and wealth of the Tacoma-Pierce County business community, Pierson established valuable publications such as:

  • Tacoma City Councilmembers’ scorecard
  • Voter’s guide for business
  • Legislative agenda that achieved a 90% success rate for high priority items; enabled 80 additional jobs for the downtown core; and brought in more than $100M in local projects

Leading the charge, Pierson has tackled large-scale issues that have great impact on the local business community. A few of these include:

  • Paid leave ordinance
  • A phased-in minimum wage for Tacoma (opposing 15Now)
  • Local road and transportation packages that will result in 80,000 jobs
  • The completion of Highway 167 to connect Tacoma’s port with local highway infrastructure
  • The expansion of Interstate 5 near the JBLM military base to relive extreme traffic congestion
  • Resisting a national agenda to restrict business water usage in Tacoma’s industrial port area

2016, TPCC was one of four finalists for the ACCE Chamber of the Year Award. This accomplishment is a result of Pierson’s leadership and the Chamber’s commitment to be the voice for business; to increase job opportunities in the community; and taking a fierce stance on key business initiatives.

Pierson is an inspiration, spending his professional career investing in the Pierce County community where he and his family reside.

 

Registration & Event Information:
  • Emerald Queen Casino 5580 Pacific Hwy East, Fife, WA 98424
    (The Ballroom & Conference Center is located West of the Casino across the parking lot)
  • 11:30  Registration/networking
  • 12:00  Lunch served
  • Cost  $25 prepaid, drawing is an additional $5 for 6 tickets
    ** Additional $10 for walk-in members and non-members
  • Register Online, by email, or fill out the registration form

The TCT meets September through June on the second Monday of every month for networking, lunch and dynamic speakers on important issues to the transportation industry. Members, their guests and others are invited.

Upcoming luncheon meetings:

  • November 13th
  • December 11th
Have a credit card on file? Email us that you’re planning to attend!
THANK YOU to all who contributed door prizes at our last meeting! All proceeds go toward TCT’s Scholarship Program.

Leadership by Kelci Parker

As a student who attends Spokane Falls Community College, I’ve shown my leadership skills as a collegiate golfer. Being a part of such a highly competitive team; I’ve learned that being encouraging at all times creates a good environment for everyone. I like to bring people up with the things I say when I can tell they are feeling down. There are three principles that I live by and demonstrate on a daily basis as I lead my team on and off the golf course.

The first principle that I live my life by and demonstrate to my team mates is, “Your attitude toward anything in life is completely in your control” -Micah Lacerte. Most people think that golf is an individual sport, but what people don’t understand is that particularly in collegiate golf, the team score is comprised of the top three individual scores. I’ve experienced this first-hand at the Grays Harbor Open this past fall. I placed second overall as an individual but I was just one piece to the puzzle that led my team to place first overall.  The only way this was achieved was because after the first round, we were able to debrief as a team and motivate each other to be even better in the second round.

My second principle is, “Obstacles are those frightful things you see when you take your eyes off your goal” – Henry Ford. On the course, you see all types of obstacles including trees, water hazards, sand traps, out of bounds areas, and more. Golf courses are a good example of life.  Amongst all those obstacles I must focus on the best way to get the ball into the cup.  As a team, we have to learn the course and how we should play each hole.  We talk with each other as we practice and discuss the best strategy to accomplish our goal-to finish eighteen holes with the fewest strokes.  As a leader on my team I have found that by encouraging others to see beyond the obstacles we don’t allow the obstacles to become barriers to our goals.  I also believe that this principle renders true in life as there will always be barriers.  We must relentlessly press forward.

My third and final leadership principal that I demonstrate in all aspects of my life is, “Be somebody who makes everybody feel like a somebody” – Unknown. This is the most important principle because it is applicable in all aspects of my life. Words of affirmation has made a drastic impact on my life, and it has been by the grace of encouragement that I have had the motivation to pursue my goal, and witness the success on the golf course. But, as much as I love to receive inspiring words of encouragement to help me through obstacles, I equally like to encourage others. I love making sure that whatever I say to people, especially my teammates, is something that they will always remember and remind them that they are special in every way. I believe in the power of words, and I believe that speaking life into situations, will not only change your attitude, connecting this to my first leadership principle, but the positive words can intervene in any situation. In my first season as a collegiate athlete, this principle has remained the foundation of my success in the transition into a new school, and on a new team, golfing new courses. The only thing that remained constant was the positivity, and that is something I treasure, and utilize for each and every person I meet.

In conclusion, the core of my leadership has been demonstrated throughout my experience as a member of a high school and college golf team.  There are so many obstacles in life and on a golf course  that can take away one’s focus on the goal.  Leaders encourage and leaders lead by example.  My experiences allow my leadership to grow.

Micheal J. Serio | Wells Fargo

Michael J. Serio is the regional chief investment officer for the Mountain Northwest region of Wells Fargo Private Bank. He leads a team of investment professionals who deliver comprehensive, custom, diversified portfolio management for clients of The Private Bank. In his role, Mr. Serio serves as the investment thought leader in the region by providing insight and interpretation of the economy and financial markets at client events and through written commentary.

Prior to joining Wells Fargo in 2013, Mr. Serio co-founded Wolf Creek Energy Partners, which was formed to finance minority interests in the shale oil and gas business. Prior to Wolf Creek Energy Partners, he served as managing director for Citigroup Private Bank in Denver where he oversaw the investment process for five private bank offices serving the ultra affluent. He started his career as a portfolio manager for First National Bank of Chicago. He has also worked as a portfolio manager for Sanford Bernstein, JP Morgan, and Stein Roe & Farnham. Mr. Serio has more than 25 years of experience in financial services.

He was an adjunct professor at the University of Denver and DePaul University, and has guest lectured at Stetson University and the University of Colorado. In addition, Mr. Serio taught Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) review courses for Stalla/Becker-Convisor from 1994 to 2003.

He earned a Bachelor of Science in Economics from the University of Illinois at Champaign and a Master of Business Administration in Finance from DePaul University. Mr. Serio is a CFA® charterholder and Chartered Alternative Investment Analyst (CAJASM) designee. He previously served as a committee chair and board director for the CFA Society of Chicago and was on the board of the Colorado Council for Economic Education. He currently serves on the boardof directors for the HeartLight Center. Mr. Serio is based in Denver, Colorado.

 

Registration & Event Information:
  • Emerald Queen Casino 5580 Pacific Hwy East, Fife, WA 98424
    (The Ballroom & Conference Center is located West of the Casino across the parking lot)
  • 11:30  Registration/networking
  • 12:00  Lunch served
  • Cost  $25 prepaid, drawing is an additional $5 for 6 tickets
    ** Additional $10 for walk-in members and non-members
  • Register by email, fill out the registration form

The TCT meets September through June on the second Monday of every month for networking, lunch and dynamic speakers on important issues to the transportation industry. Members, their guests and others are invited.

Upcoming luncheon meetings:

  • October 9th
  • November 13th
  • December 11th
Have a credit card on file? Email us that you’re planning to attend!
THANK YOU to all who contributed door prizes at our last meeting! All proceeds go toward TCT’s Scholarship Program.