Author Archive for TCTacoma

Leadership by Kelci Parker

As a student who attends Spokane Falls Community College, I’ve shown my leadership skills as a collegiate golfer. Being a part of such a highly competitive team; I’ve learned that being encouraging at all times creates a good environment for everyone. I like to bring people up with the things I say when I can tell they are feeling down. There are three principles that I live by and demonstrate on a daily basis as I lead my team on and off the golf course.

The first principle that I live my life by and demonstrate to my team mates is, “Your attitude toward anything in life is completely in your control” -Micah Lacerte. Most people think that golf is an individual sport, but what people don’t understand is that particularly in collegiate golf, the team score is comprised of the top three individual scores. I’ve experienced this first-hand at the Grays Harbor Open this past fall. I placed second overall as an individual but I was just one piece to the puzzle that led my team to place first overall.  The only way this was achieved was because after the first round, we were able to debrief as a team and motivate each other to be even better in the second round.

My second principle is, “Obstacles are those frightful things you see when you take your eyes off your goal” – Henry Ford. On the course, you see all types of obstacles including trees, water hazards, sand traps, out of bounds areas, and more. Golf courses are a good example of life.  Amongst all those obstacles I must focus on the best way to get the ball into the cup.  As a team, we have to learn the course and how we should play each hole.  We talk with each other as we practice and discuss the best strategy to accomplish our goal-to finish eighteen holes with the fewest strokes.  As a leader on my team I have found that by encouraging others to see beyond the obstacles we don’t allow the obstacles to become barriers to our goals.  I also believe that this principle renders true in life as there will always be barriers.  We must relentlessly press forward.

My third and final leadership principal that I demonstrate in all aspects of my life is, “Be somebody who makes everybody feel like a somebody” – Unknown. This is the most important principle because it is applicable in all aspects of my life. Words of affirmation has made a drastic impact on my life, and it has been by the grace of encouragement that I have had the motivation to pursue my goal, and witness the success on the golf course. But, as much as I love to receive inspiring words of encouragement to help me through obstacles, I equally like to encourage others. I love making sure that whatever I say to people, especially my teammates, is something that they will always remember and remind them that they are special in every way. I believe in the power of words, and I believe that speaking life into situations, will not only change your attitude, connecting this to my first leadership principle, but the positive words can intervene in any situation. In my first season as a collegiate athlete, this principle has remained the foundation of my success in the transition into a new school, and on a new team, golfing new courses. The only thing that remained constant was the positivity, and that is something I treasure, and utilize for each and every person I meet.

In conclusion, the core of my leadership has been demonstrated throughout my experience as a member of a high school and college golf team.  There are so many obstacles in life and on a golf course  that can take away one’s focus on the goal.  Leaders encourage and leaders lead by example.  My experiences allow my leadership to grow.

Micheal J. Serio | Wells Fargo

Michael J. Serio is the regional chief investment officer for the Mountain Northwest region of Wells Fargo Private Bank. He leads a team of investment professionals who deliver comprehensive, custom, diversified portfolio management for clients of The Private Bank. In his role, Mr. Serio serves as the investment thought leader in the region by providing insight and interpretation of the economy and financial markets at client events and through written commentary.

Prior to joining Wells Fargo in 2013, Mr. Serio co-founded Wolf Creek Energy Partners, which was formed to finance minority interests in the shale oil and gas business. Prior to Wolf Creek Energy Partners, he served as managing director for Citigroup Private Bank in Denver where he oversaw the investment process for five private bank offices serving the ultra affluent. He started his career as a portfolio manager for First National Bank of Chicago. He has also worked as a portfolio manager for Sanford Bernstein, JP Morgan, and Stein Roe & Farnham. Mr. Serio has more than 25 years of experience in financial services.

He was an adjunct professor at the University of Denver and DePaul University, and has guest lectured at Stetson University and the University of Colorado. In addition, Mr. Serio taught Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) review courses for Stalla/Becker-Convisor from 1994 to 2003.

He earned a Bachelor of Science in Economics from the University of Illinois at Champaign and a Master of Business Administration in Finance from DePaul University. Mr. Serio is a CFA® charterholder and Chartered Alternative Investment Analyst (CAJASM) designee. He previously served as a committee chair and board director for the CFA Society of Chicago and was on the board of the Colorado Council for Economic Education. He currently serves on the boardof directors for the HeartLight Center. Mr. Serio is based in Denver, Colorado.

 

Registration & Event Information:
  • Emerald Queen Casino 5580 Pacific Hwy East, Fife, WA 98424
    (The Ballroom & Conference Center is located West of the Casino across the parking lot)
  • 11:30  Registration/networking
  • 12:00  Lunch served
  • Cost  $25 prepaid, drawing is an additional $5 for 6 tickets
    ** Additional $10 for walk-in members and non-members
  • Register by email, fill out the registration form

The TCT meets September through June on the second Monday of every month for networking, lunch and dynamic speakers on important issues to the transportation industry. Members, their guests and others are invited.

Upcoming luncheon meetings:

  • October 9th
  • November 13th
  • December 11th
Have a credit card on file? Email us that you’re planning to attend!
THANK YOU to all who contributed door prizes at our last meeting! All proceeds go toward TCT’s Scholarship Program.

My name is Madeline Miller, and I am a 20-year-old sophomore student at Saint Martin’s University. All of my various positions of leadership, through my involvement in numerous activities has brought me to where I am today. Currently I am double majoring in Political Science and History, this semester I have started to take classes to complete a minor in Legal Studies. Recently I found out that I am two classes away from a Minor in Global Studies as well, which is something I will be completing by graduation. I plan on continuing to attend St. Martin’s University for two more years and obtaining my Bachelor’s Degree with the previously aforementioned double majors and minors, and then continuing my education at law school to earn my Juris Doctorate and pursue a legal career. Ideally I would like to practice Maritime, Transportation, or Trade law. I have been a leader in many different facets of my school, work and community throughout the years and my leadership pursuits as well as qualities have paved the way for the degree and education that I am currently working on, and essentially shaped who I am today.

In regards to school I challenge myself with higher level classes (300+) and an 18 credit per semester course load, and I involve myself on campus in various activities. There is a famous quote by Ray Kroc: “The quality of a leader is reflected in the standards they set for themselves,” this is one of my favorite quotes. I set high standards for myself in all I do, but with school especially. I have participated in activities and taken on tasks beyond my comfort zone, pursuing positions of leadership that I otherwise would not have pursued. For example, I am on the Saint Martin’s University Cheerleading Team, where my teammates and coaches voted for me to be Captain for the past two years, and I have recently been elected again for the next year. Throughout the school year I was also on the Board of Trustees committees for Student Affairs and Academic Affairs. I was also invited to be on the Institutional Student Affairs Committee by the Dean of Students, and have held that position since my freshman year. Last Spring I ran for and was elected to the position of Executive Secretary on the student government (Associated Students of Saint Martin’s University) for the 2016-2017 school year. I intend on running for re-election in the position of Vice President in the Spring again this year. I was inducted into the esteemed honor society on campus; The Society of Fellows, for my academic achievements, campus involvement, leadership skills and “contributions to the Human family.” Additionally I work as an English tutor in the library at school tutoring students of all levels (Freshman to Masters) including International Students. In high school I was highly involved in various leadership roles as well. I was ASB Vice President, heavily involved in the National Honor Society, as well as Cheerleading Captain of both squads for my junior and senior years. I also was in Leadership, Yearbook, Theater and FFA in high school. My parents always kept me very involved and so I learned invaluable leadership skills throughout all the activities I participated in.

Moreover I strive to exude the qualities of a great leader in the various jobs that I have held over the years. Throughout my childhood, and still now, I work for my Mom’s catering company, in this position I use my leadership skills for customer service and efficiency, sometimes also problem solving as catering is unpredictable! My first official job outside the family business was as a Retail Sales Associate at Rue21, I put my leadership skills to work through customer service and challenging myself to reach new sales goals. I was top in sales on several occasions, Employee of the Month, and I also received several positive customer comment cards. Later on in high school I obtained a position at Starbucks as a barista, there I put a great deal of leadership skills to use in the fast paced environment, I was typically the first person called to cover shifts because I am very reliable. I learned invaluable customer service skills and problem solving. Currently I am working at Saint Martin’s University as a tutor, this uses many of my leadership skills. Such as patience, extensive knowledge, and kindness to tutor students effectively and yield returns to the tutoring center. I also currently am working at Doria’s prom and bridal shop on the weekends, which involves a great deal of customer service skills. Sometimes I am with a single customer for hours on end, helping them find the perfect gown, and you have to build a relationship with clients. Another professional position I held was as an intern at a private company within the transportation industry. Taking the initiative to pursue an internship as a freshmen exemplifies my leadership skills on several levels. I learned a great deal at the internship and I currently have four different internship opportunities for the upcoming summer.

Finally within the community I find myself taking on various leadership roles while volunteering my time at different organizations and events. I believe that it is the duty of those who have the ability to give back to the community in any way possible. All of my various volunteer endeavors are listed in the application but there are a few that I am most proud of, the times I get to volunteer with children! I love being able to work with children whether it is through cheerleading, reading or any of the other various events I participate in that involve kids. Setting an example is something I believe in firmly because there is always someone watching you, if you are fortunate to have a little set of eyes looking up to you, then there is great power to make a difference. Leadership essentially is making a difference, helping others and setting a positive example for others to do so as well.

In conclusion, I believe that being a leader has brought me where I am today and lit the path that I have for the future. Being a leader has taught me many invaluable lessons and qualities such as confidence, focus, grace under pressure, integrity, passion and patience. These are all qualities that I have learned through being involved in school, work, and my community. Leadership has instilled in me a drive for changing the world, a sense of agency and the desire to help and inspire others!

William A. Ryberg | Tacoma Community College

Bill Ryberg is the interim Co-President and Vice President for College Advancement at Tacoma Community College and also serves as the director of the Tacoma Community College Foundation. A native of the Puget Sound area , Bill joined TCC in 2011 with credentials in the non-profit arena where he has served as President and CEO, as well as a long-term history in the financial services industry.

Bill brings an extensive background in working with and managing multiple lines of business within a single organization. He brings external relations and business development experience as well an understanding of fiscal environments. Bill served as Vice President and Regional Manager of Key Bank for Northwest Washington State, where he oversaw more than 200 employees in over 20 branch offices, and served as a leader in such diverse efforts as sales management, human resource development, accredited national quality service initiatives, and segmented market management development.

As director of the TCC Foundation, Bill works with a committed board of directors who have increased fundraising and community awareness in support of TCC students.

Bill graduated from Western Washington University in Bellingham and earned his Masters of Music degree in music from Indiana University.

 

Registration & Event Information:
  • La Quinta Inn & Suites 1425 E 27th St Tacoma, WA 98421
  • 11:30  Registration/networking
  • 12:00  Lunch served
  • Cost  $25 prepaid, drawing is an additional $5 for 6 tickets
    ** Additional $10 for walk-in members and non-members
  • Register by email or fill out the registration form

The TCT meets September through June on the second Monday of every month for networking, lunch and dynamic speakers on important issues to the transportation industry. Members, their guests and others are invited.

Upcoming luncheon meetings:

  • June 12th – TBD
Have a credit card on file? Email us that you’re planning to attend!
THANK YOU to all who contributed door prizes at our last meeting! All proceeds go toward TCT’s Scholarship Program.

If Bob Dylan wrote a song about the state of the today’s container shipping industry, it might be called “The Lines, They are a Changin’.”

In April, three new major carrier alliances started operating around the world. With these new alliances came new challenges to ports. The three alliances are:

  • THE Alliance: Hapag-Lloyd, Yang Ming, “K” Line, MOL and NYK Line,
  • Ocean Alliance: COSCO Shipping, CMA-CGM/APL, Evergreen and OOCL, and
  • 2M Alliance: Maersk/Hamburg-Sud, Mediterranean Shipping Company and Hyundai (slot charter partner).

While these alliances were formed to help the lines reduce costs and increase efficiency, they have also changed cargo flows at various terminals in Tacoma and Seattle. These changes have also created some operational challenges for ports, terminal operators and transportation providers.

SHIPPING LINE SHUFFLES: As part of the new shipping line alliances launched in April, Hapag-Lloyd ships, which have been calling at Washington United Terminals in the South Harbor, are now calling at Terminal 18 in the North Harbor.

To help mitigate these changes, The Northwest Seaport Alliance (NWSA) Operations Service Center is actively monitoring all gate activity at the impacted container terminals.

NWSA staff is addressing container congestion issues and also meeting with truckers, terminal operators and other impacted stakeholders.

Two major areas of container volume impacts and some congestion have been Terminal 18 in Seattle and Husky Terminal in Tacoma.

Here are some of the steps being taken to improve these situations:

  • SSA is opening its gates at Terminal 18 an hour earlier (7 a.m.)
  • Husky Terminal is opening its gates earlier in the morning and has also run some Saturday gates.
  • NWSA staff is working with the Seattle Police Department and the Tacoma Police Department to address terminal truck queuing issues.

The NWSA continues to work with its partners to explore additional improvements that could be made in the future.

Here are two ways you can keep up-to-date on these issues and developments:

  1. Find out more about what’s happening at Terminal 18, Husky Terminal and truck queuing issues here.
  2. Check the marine terminal websites directly for the latest information on their hours and service conditions.

For information on South Harbor (Tacoma) terminals, contact Tim Ebner, NWSA Operations Department, at 253-592-6719 or tebner@nwseaportalliance.com.

For more information on this situation in the North Harbor (Seattle), please contact Steve Queen, NWSA Operations Department, at 253-888-4412 or squeen@nwseaportalliance.com.

 

Rick Bingle | Recreational Equipment, Inc. (REI)

As vice president of Supply Chain, Rick Bingle is responsible for REI’s Supply Chain Division comprising of Distribution, Logistics including Trade and Compliance, Sales and Customer Support, Vendor Operations, Network Strategy and Omni channel fulfillment.

Prior to becoming vice president of Supply Chain, Rick was REI’s director of Global Supply Chain, was senior manager of Global Supply Chain at Microsoft and spent 11 years at Office Depot in distribution-related management.

Rick serves as a board of advisors for the University of Washington’s Master’s Degree Program in Supply Chain Transportation and Logistics (SCTL). The Advisory Board members help review content, guide course design and provide updates to ensure the program remains current as the field involves.

REI is a $3 billion national multichannel retail co-op headquartered outside of Seattle. With more than 6 million active members, REI serves the needs of outdoor adventurers through innovative, quality products; inspiring classes and trips; and integrated customer service that allows shoppers to buy great gear and clothing in any way they want. REI has 143 stores in 35 states, as well as REI.com and REI.com/outlet. This year REI will invest $8 million in local communities to help care for outdoor spaces.

 

Registration & Event Information:
  • La Quinta Inn & Suites 1425 E 27th St Tacoma, WA 98421
  • 11:30  Registration/networking
  • 12:00  Lunch served
  • Cost  $25 prepaid, drawing is an additional $5 for 6 tickets
    ** Additional $10 for walk-in members and non-members
  • Register by email or fill out the registration form

The TCT meets September through June on the second Monday of every month for networking, lunch and dynamic speakers on important issues to the transportation industry. Members, their guests and others are invited.

Upcoming luncheon meetings:

  • June 12th – TBD
Have a credit card on file? Email us that you’re planning to attend!
THANK YOU to all who contributed door prizes at our last meeting! All proceeds go toward TCT’s Scholarship Program.

By Holly Decker, Account Executive – COSCO Shipping PNW

March is Women’s history month and on March 8, International Women’s day I found myself at a social event to revel in the many accomplishments of women across the globe. Afterwards my mind wanders to profiling the women in the room – none of whom were in transportation.  They say the top is a lonely place for the female worker, but in transportation it rings especially true. On the tail end of Women’s History month, it seemed appropriate to share some stats on women in our sector so we can begin to write a new history.

The amount of data on women in transportation fields is limited so it’s hard to get a good grasp of what’s going on out there but I can tell you, the majority of times I walk into a room, I don’t see too many folks that resemble my gender identity. In 2007, the Transportation Cooperative Research Program (TCRP) and National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) conducted a benchmark scoping report on gender diversity in State DOT’s and transit agencies. What they found was that women, regardless of professional service category, were routinely underutilized. I could note some statistics about race here, but sticking with gender, I’ll note that the only occupation category where all women, regardless of ethnicity were not underutilized was administrative support.

A 2012 study by Women in Transportation (WIT) discovered that while women make up 47% of the US workforce, in the transportation related sector women make up less than 13% of the workforce, and only 17.4% of those women are manager level or higher. One might hypothesize that the transportation gender gap is a tandem trajectory of sector advancement and institutionalized gender roles – there’s fewer women in the business because women didn’t used to work! Maybe we have a lot of office ladies rather than female Execs because education and mentorship has only been male to male by (de)fault of history. I’d say we’re a little late for that argument but regardless, in 2015, a poll conducted by SCM World revealed that amongst global universities offering supply chain courses, women accounted for 37% of students but only 5% of top level supply chain positions are held by women.

Just last year the Peterson Institute for International Economics in partnership with Ernst and Young confirms what we’ve known for some time now, that there is a correlation between women in leadership positions and company profitability. Typically defined “female” traits are highly beneficial to business, particularly, I’d argue, when it comes to working in supply chain where collaborative skills being especially important. The ability to effectively negotiate and work with multiple stakeholders—whether internally or externally, and multitasking against timelines—is key to effective and efficient supply chain management. Most people agree that men and women work in different ways and bring different strengths and perspectives to the table meaning, gender diversity brings better business decisions and solutions to customers. If the industry is not actively hiring, nurturing and promoting women, it’s falling short of its potential.

So, what do we do about it? How do we rewrite history? It’s more complicated than simply hiring more females. First, we have to recognize the value diversity brings to businesses (see above paragraph on diversity=profitability), prioritize it as a value, and live it. Second, we have to recognize that for women in the workforce, many at one point or another face a critical junction: choosing between family and full-time employment. Women who work in and outside the home have different needs than other employees. HR consultants can play an enormous role in helping companies navigate work/life balance strategies that help to support the values business want to uphold. Third, it’s important that businesses identify talent and retention strategies to get over diversity hurdles.  Beth Ford, Group Executive VP and COO at Land O’Lakes, places responsibility of a company to promote more opportunities for women “senior leaders have a critical role to play: they must sponsor high potential women, which means actively working to position them effectively; understanding the challenge presented; and being direct in counseling about the importance of mobility and flexibility on their career trajectory.”

Finally, the responsibility of lessening gender disparity in the transportation sector falls not only to male advocates and businesses, but to the women in this business as well. Ladies, we need to network, convene, collaborate, promote, and support one another to inspire more women to be a part of this dynamic and challenging sector. We need to see more women in transportation for the benefit of our companies, employers, and community.

There are a few organizations in the Puget Sound that convene women in the transportation sector: WTS Puget Sound, WISTA – PNW Chapter, WIT. Do you know of more? Please send me an email at hdecker@cosco-usa.com.

Sources:

 

 

 

Grant Goodale | Founder & CTO of Convoy

Grant Goodale is the co-founder and CTO of Convoy, the world’s most innovative trucking company.

Prior to starting Convoy, Grant has almost 20 years of experience in startups across products in both consumer and enterprise, at companies including FastForward Networks (acquired by Inktomi), Reactivity (acquired by Cisco), Context Optional (acquired by Adobe). He holds a Masters in CS from Cornell and a BA from USC.

Registration & Event Information:
NOTE: This meeting is in conjunction with the Transportation Club of Seattle and will be hosted by the TCS at the Rainier Golf & Country Club.
  • Topic: Technology Disruption in Transportation
  • Date: Wednesday, April 5th, 2017
  • Time: 11:30am reception, Lunch 12:00pm – 1:15pm
  • Where: Rainier Golf and Country Club
  • Cost: $24 per person preregistered / $30 at the door

 

The TCT meets September through June on the second Monday of every month for networking, lunch and dynamic speakers on important issues to the transportation industry. Members, their guests and others are invited.

Upcoming luncheon meetings:

  • May 8th – Rick Bingle, REI
Have a credit card on file? Email us that you’re planning to attend!
THANK YOU to all who contributed door prizes at our last meeting! All proceeds go toward TCT’s Scholarship Program.