Author Archive for TCTacoma

Karen Turner Lee | Pioneer Human Services

As Chief Executive Officer of Pioneer Human Services, Karen Lee leads one of the nation’s largest social-enterprise business organizations. Under Karen’s leadership, Pioneer successfully operates several businesses that generate revenue to meet customer needs and bottom line expectations that help fund its social mission.

Karen leads Pioneer’s unique business model and its 900 plus employees in over 60 locations throughout the state of Washington. Pioneer serves approximately 10,000 people annually through its job training, employment and other services to recover and rehabilitate their lives after experiences with criminal justice and substance use disorder.

Pioneer’s major business enterprise, known as Pioneer Industries, is an aerospace manufacturing company with over 100,000 square feet in two plants in greater Seattle. Pioneer makes over 1,000,000 parts annually and is known throughout the aerospace industry for superb quality, on time delivery and customer service.

Karen has an impressive career both in business and the public sector. She served for five years as the Commissioner of the Washington State Employment Security Department. She was an executive and had several leadership roles at Puget Sound Energy. Karen was also an associate attorney at K & L Gates in Seattle.

Karen is a native Washingtonian and is a graduate of the University of Washington School of Law. She is Washington’s first female African American graduate of the United States Military Academy at West Point. There she earned a Bachelor of Science degree with a concentration in Russian Studies and a minor in engineering. She spent four years in the U.S. Army as a logistics officer stationed in Germany and Maryland.

Active in the community, Karen is a trustee at Western Washington University and a member of the Regence Blue Shield (Health Care) and U.S. Bank Washington Advisory Boards. She is also an appointed member of Washington’s Statewide Reentry Council. Karen has been named one of “Seattle’s Women of Influence” by the Puget Sound Business Journal, and more recently, received an “Executive Excellence” award from Seattle Business Magazine.

**Reminder – Also for our March meeting is the Carla Martin Drive for Mary Bridge Children’s Hospital, so be sure to bring your donations of infant/baby toys and latex free bandages!

 

Registration & Event Information:
  • Emerald Queen Casino Ballroom & Conference Center 5580 Pacific Hwy East, Fife, WA 98424
    (The Ballroom & Conference Center is located West of the Casino across the parking lot)
  • 11:15 am  Registration/networking
  • 11:30 am  Lunch served
  • Cost is $25 prepaid prior to March 10th, drawing is an additional $5 for 6 tickets
    ** Additional $10 for walk-in members, member sales on day of event, and non-members
  • Register online, by email, or fill out the registration form

The TCT meets September through June on the second Monday of every month for networking, lunch and dynamic speakers on important issues to the transportation industry. Members, their guests and others are invited.

Upcoming luncheon meetings:

  • April 9th – Brandon Unterbrink, BNSF
  • May 14th – Dr. Ali Modarres, University of Washington
  • June 11th – John Wolfe, Northwest Seaport Alliance
Have a credit card on file? Email us that you’re planning to attend!
THANK YOU to all who contributed door prizes at our last meeting! All proceeds go toward TCT’s Scholarship Program.

EFN Event – June 16, 2018

Mark your calendar for Casino Royale!

SATURDAY, JUNE 16, 2018

7:00 pm – 11:00 pm
Tacoma Mountaineers Club, 2302 N 30th St, Tacoma 98403

Join Emergency Food Network’s Ambassador Board for a fun night at the 5th Annual Casino Royale fundraising event! All proceeds go to support Pierce County food pantries and meal sites through the work of Emergency Food Network.

Eat, drink, and gamble for a great cause!

You can register here.


2/6/2018 UPDATE: As discussed at the meeting, the following information is now available:
      – Presentation from today’s luncheon
      – NWSA February 6th meeting agenda with more presentation material
      – NWSA February 6th meeting video


NWSA Clean Truck Program

Please join us on February 12th, 2018 for a discussion led by the Northwest Seaport Alliance about their Clean Truck Program.  From the NWSA’s website:

The Northwest Seaport Alliance harbors represent a small percentage of overall emissions in the region. However, we are committed to cleaner air in the Puget Sound region. The Clean Truck Program is one of the many initiatives the NWSA and ports of Seattle and Tacoma have undertaken to address the air quality and greenhouse gas impacts of our gateway. The NWSA is committed to ensuring we have a sufficient supply of trucks to service the cargo in the terminals.

In 2008, the ports of Tacoma, Seattle and Vancouver, B.C., adopted the Northwest Ports Clean Air Strategy, with a goal to have 100 percent of the drayage trucks serving container terminals with cleaner diesel technology – a 2007 engine with diesel particulate filter or equivalent. In 2010, we achieved the first goal in the Northwest Ports Clean Air Strategy that all trucks be at least a model year 1994 or newer. Since that goal was set, we have invested more than $15 million in matching grant funds to spur truck conversion and invest in gate infrastructure. More than 410 trucks were scrapped and replaced with new trucks through partnership with the Puget Sound Clean Air Agency and funding through DERA, CMAQ and Department of Ecology grants.

EFFECTIVE APRIL 1, 2018, NON-COMPLIANT TRUCKS WILL BE DENIED ACCESS TO NWSA INTERNATIONAL CONTAINER TERMINALS (Pending Managing Member approval)
Until April 1: Trucks must be engine year 1994 or newer.
After April 1: Trucks must be engine year 2007 or newer.

More detailed information can be fount on the NWSA’s website.

Dustin Stoker | NWSA

Dustin Stoker leads alliance operations.  He oversees all port operations, from waterway management and road and rail functions to breakbulk and terminal operations. Stoker’s team is charged with establishing the NWSA’s Operations Service Center to provide best in class service delivery and customer care.

Stoker brings more than 19 years of experience in both domestic and international terminal management. He most recently served as director of operations at the Port of Tacoma since 2013.

Before joining the Port of Tacoma, Stoker served as director of Deltaport at Port Metro Vancouver, B.C., with Terminal Systems, Inc. He also has served as the chief operations officer at Abu Dhabi Terminals, and in management positions with APM Terminals at the Port of Salalah, Netherlands, Los Angeles and Tacoma.

Stoker holds a bachelor’s degree in business administration with a concentration in management from the University of Washington.

Jason Jordan | NWSA

Jason Jordan was named the Port of Tacoma’s environmental programs director in February of 2011. In July of 2014 he was also asked to lead the Port’s planning group resulting in a new title of Director of Environmental and Planning Services. Prior to the director’s position, he served as an environmental programs senior manager from July 2008 to February 2011. With the formation of the Northwest Seaport Alliance, Jason’s role spans both the Homeport of Tacoma and the Alliance.

Before joining the Port of Tacoma Jason served as an environmental program manager at the Port of Seattle for 2 years and as a land use planner for 2 years. Prior to the Port of Seattle, he worked at the City of Renton and the City of Bainbridge Island, where he focused on current planning, project development, SEPA review, and shoreline development projects.

He earned a bachelor’s degree in Economics from Western Washington University and a Master’s degree in Public Administration from Washington State University.

Nick Demerice | NWSA

Nick Demerice heads the Northwest Seaport Alliance’s public affairs team. He came to the alliance with more than 10 years of experience in government affairs, most recently as assistant director for external relations at the Washington State Department of Commerce.

In his position, Mr. Demerice oversees the communications and government affairs departments, which handle internal and external communications, local, state and federal government relations and community relations.

Mr. Demerice holds a bachelor’s degree in political science from the University of Washington.

 

Registration & Event Information:

Emerald Queen Casino Ballroom & Conference Center
5580 Pacific Hwy East, Fife, WA 98424
(The Ballroom & Conference Center is located West of the Casino across the parking lot)

11:15 am  Registration/networking
11:45 am  Lunch served

Cost  $25 prepaid, drawing is an additional $5 for 6 tickets
** Additional $10 for walk-in members and non-members

Register online, by email, or fill out the registration form

 

The TCT meets September through June on the second Monday of every month for networking, lunch and dynamic speakers on important issues to the transportation industry. Members, their guests and others are invited.

Upcoming luncheon meetings:

  • March 12th
  • April 9th
  • May 14th
  • June 11th
Have a credit card on file? Email us that you’re planning to attend!
THANK YOU to all who contributed door prizes at our last meeting! All proceeds go toward TCT’s Scholarship Program.

Jason Berry | Alaska Air Group

Jason Berry provides executive oversight of Alaska Air Cargo, within Alaska Air Group.

Jason and his team are responsible for managing the day-to-day air cargo business, leading a diverse workforce comprised of Sales, Marketing, Operations and Revenue Management departments.

In his role, Jason engages with Federal and State staff officials regarding policy impacting the cargo business, representing Alaska at trade and industry events.

Prior to his current role, Jason previously served as Director, Cargo Operations & Compliance for Alaska Air Group, with responsibility for all aspects of cargo operations within Alaska Air Group and its subsidiaries.

With over 20 years experience in the aviation industry, Jason possesses a strong commercial and operational background, with an emphasis on managing air transportation sales, marketing and operational teams.

A native of Washington state and graduate of Central Washington University, Jason currently resides in University Place, Washington with his wife and three daughters.

Jason is currently pursuing his Executive MBA at the University of
Washington’s Foster School of Business.

 

Registration & Event Information:

The TCT meets September through June on the second Monday of every month for networking, lunch and dynamic speakers on important issues to the transportation industry. Members, their guests and others are invited.

Upcoming luncheon meetings:

  • February 12th
  • March 12th
Have a credit card on file? Email us that you’re planning to attend!
THANK YOU to all who contributed door prizes at our last meeting! All proceeds go toward TCT’s Scholarship Program.

The Transportation Club of Tacoma invites you to attend the Holiday Luncheon and Auction benefiting the Emergency Food Network. 

Please contact Lori Kincannon (253-326-1292) or Michele McDonald (253-414-1356) for Silent Auction, Live Auction or Drawing Donations.

Registration & Event Information:
  • Emerald Queen Casino Ballroom & Conference Center
    5580 Pacific Hwy East, Fife, WA 98424
    (The Ballroom & Conference Center is located West of the Casino across the parking lot)
  • 11:00 am  Registration/networking
  • 11:45 am  Lunch served
  • 2:00 pm  Event conclusion
  • Cost  $35 prepaid, drawing is an additional $25 for 6 tickets
    ** Additional $15 for walk-in members and non-members
  • Register Online or by email

 

Contributions or gifts to the Transportation Club of Tacoma are not tax deductible as charitable contributions.

 


Emergency Food Network – Working to End Hunger in Pierce County since 1982

Each December our club holds the Emergency Food Network Food Drive and Fundraiser at our Christmas luncheon. All proceeds from the event go to EFN who’ll use the proceeds to feed local people in our community. The event includes a visit from the local high school choir and speakers who bring in the Christmas spirit by helping auction off great gifts for the membership. This past December we raised more than $34,000. What’s even more incredible is how much food we can expect our efforts will produce. Currently, EFN is able to convert every $1 raised into $12 worth of food. This means that we were able to bring in $386,000 worth of food to the people in our community. Our membership is thrilled they can have such a huge impact in our community.

Since 1999, we have been able to raise over 1 million dollars in food for EFN. Come join us at our December luncheon where we’ll once again bring you a little Christmas joy and goodwill to the people in our community.

By Greg Mowat – Principal/Owner –  GTM Transformations LLC (SDVOB)    

I have always been aware of Veterans Day in early November – As a youngster visiting my maternal Grandparents before Thanksgiving I remember my Grandma helping the American Legion Post 154 (Ferndale, WA) Lady’s Auxiliary prepare poppies to be distributed in memory of those who fought in WWI (my grandfather was a veteran of the “Big War”). My Father is a veteran of WWII serving in the European theater from D Day to the occupation of Germany – Returning home shortly before the armistice with Japan, concerned as he did not have enough “points” to prevent possible re-deployment to the Pacific. The surrender in the Pacific ended his brief, though eventful, military career.

He had hoped that WWII would be the end of our Family’s contribution to military service, making his “war stories” the last to be shared around the table after large holiday dinners. He had friends who served in Korea, some of whom did not return much to his sadness. I was the oldest child in the immediate family and brother to two sisters; Dad opined that he was glad that I would be spared his experience on the battle field and the loss of those that one grows close to because of shared experience during training and warfare. Such would not be the case – I graduated from High School in the summer of 1967, attended community college through December of that year, relinquished a 2s deferment in January of 1968 and was in the United States Army on August 19th, 1968. I joined via enlistment, my longest duty station was Phu Loi, South Vietnam – August of 1969 to September of 1971 – with the 128th Assault Helicopter Co.

I am fond of telling friends and acquaintances that my military service was short, but eventful – I came away with a refined understanding of friendship, an experienced grasp of pragmatic leadership (I spent my last year in Vietnam as the NCOIC of the 128th’s avionics shop), and a respect for public/national service as the core of our national community. Many would have you believe that military service is about action, honor, valor, sacrifice, and heroism – All of that is true at a certain level and needs to be appreciated; I believe that there is a deeper, more profound level at which military service is about love, fulfillment, learning, growing and at the core, about cooperation, collaboration, and securing our shared community of friends, family, and those we love.

I have no problem with the Veteran Day sales, advertising with the flag in the background (or foreground as the case may be), and much of the general hype which accompanies the holiday activities in our commercial culture – It is all part of what I and the previous veterans, current veterans, and future veterans commit to protect as we accept the oath to the constitution upon entering the service. For the same reason, I am reasonably neutral regarding the back and forth around the flag and national anthem – I served to ensure that the freedom to honor same of not would be preserved. To curb any of this, no matter how we may individually feel, fly’s in the face of our service and the sacrifice of our comrades. Finally, I appreciate being recognized for my service, having said that, I am most honored by a rewarding career, secure community, and safe family – I matured, learned, developed, and blossomed in the U.S. Army: receiving decent work and career fulfillment is the best Thanks!

Our current 21st century veterans are amongst the best trained, best educated, highest achieving ever. I would be most thankful to my fellow Transportation Club of Tacoma colleagues for every effort that they are able to pursue to reach out to these superb women and men who have served our nation and provide opportunities for these veterans to transition successfully to civilian careers, joining the national community that their service ensured. I would further argue that all of us need to “pay forward” to these individuals to ensure that future generations of young women and men can feel secure in the knowledge that military service is a life-enhancing activity that is recognized a “plus” for future civilian career success. Anything less than that would be a tragedy for these future veterans and for our collective future.

In closing –Mark Twain said, “I am glad I did it, partly because it was well worth it, and chiefly because I shall never have to do it again.” There is certainly much of this sentiment in any reflection on military service; as the Master Sargent who recruited me into the U.S. Army put it “The army is a situation of mind over matter, they don’t mind, and you don’t matter” – I shall carry my military service close to my heart, and extend the empathy it bestowed on me to my fellow veterans and fellow citizens. I believe that all of us who have had the experience are better for the experience and need to connect that experience and its lessons to our daily life. Many Thanks to the Club for inviting my comments!

Greg Mowat – Principal/Owner –  GTM Transformations LLC (SDVOB)

Major General Bret D. Daugherty | Washington National Guard


11/13/17 UPDATE: 


Major General Bret D. Daugherty was appointed as the Adjutant General of Washington on July 28th, 2012. As the Adjutant General, he is commander of all Washington Army and Air National Guard forces and Director of the State’s Emergency Management and Enhanced 911 programs. General Daugherty also serves as Homeland Security Advisor to the Governor of Washington and as State Administrative Agent for all United States Department of Homeland Security grants awarded to Washington’s state, local, tribal and non-profit agencies and organizations.

General Daugherty attended Seattle University where he was awarded an Army Reserve Officers’ Training Corps scholarship. Upon graduating as a Distinguished Military Graduate in June of 1980, he was commissioned as a Regular Army Second Lieutenant. He left active duty in 1989 and joined the Washington Army National Guard in 1990.

AWARDS AND DECORATIONS:

  • Legion of Merit
  • Meritorious Service Medal (with 3 Bronze Oak Leaf Clusters) Army Commendation Medal (with 1 Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster) Army Achievement Medal (with 2 Bronze Oak Leaf Clusters)
  • Army Reserve Component Achievement Medal (with 3 Bronze Oak Leaf Clusters) National Defense Service Medal (with 1 Bronze Service Star)
  • Global War on Terrorism Service Medal
  • Humanitarian Service Medal
  • Armed Forces Reserve Medal (with Silver Hourglass, “M” Device, and numeral 2) Army Service Ribbon
  • Army Reserve Component Overseas Training Ribbon
  • Washington National Guard Commendation Medal
  • Washington State Emergency Service Medal (with 4 Bronze Oak Leaf Clusters) National Guard Service Ribbon
  • Senior Army Aviator Badge
  • Parachutist Badge

See General Daugherty’s full bio for more information.

 

Registration & Event Information:

The TCT meets September through June on the second Monday of every month for networking, lunch and dynamic speakers on important issues to the transportation industry. Members, their guests and others are invited.

Upcoming luncheon meetings:

  • December 11th – EFN Holiday Event
Have a credit card on file? Email us that you’re planning to attend!
THANK YOU to all who contributed door prizes at our last meeting! All proceeds go toward TCT’s Scholarship Program.

NOTE: October is National Cybersecurity Awareness Month.

If you’re not convinced that cyberattacks pose a real threat to your business and industry, then you’re not keeping up with current events. Consider these recent news headlines:

  • Equifax CEO departs, forgoes bonus after massive data breach
  • Feds tell state officials Russians tried to hack elections
  • Industry reactions to the Deloitte cyber attack

And cyberattacks are also becoming a growing threat in the shipping and transportation industry.

For example, in June, Maersk Line was the victim of a cyberattack, preventing it from accepting new orders.When the attack began, Maersk decided to take down a number of systems as a precaution. Due to limited access to some of its computer systems, Maersk, which handles one out of seven containers shipped worldwide, also had problems processing orders.

Maersk estimates that the bottom line damage done by the cyberattack was about $300 million. You can find out more about the cyberattack by watching this CNN interview with Vincent Clerc, Maersk’s chief commercial officer.

Since the attack, Maersk has taken a number of steps to improve its cybersecurity, and other shipping lines are taking additional steps to increase their data security.

For example, COSCO Shipping’s initial security efforts were to separate its centralized servers into individual servers limiting the risk for a system-wide compromise. More long-term, COSCO Shipping has established a strategic partnership with China Electronic Technology Cyber Security Co., Ltd. (China Cyber Security) aimed at establishing overall security of its customers and terminals.

During National Cybersecurity Awareness Month, many companies are running special efforts to educate their employees about ways they can help protect themselves and their company against the many cyber threats we face today.

Here are some simple tips to stay more secure and help prevent hacks and cyberattacks:

  1. Read and abide by your company’s Internet use policy.
  2. Make your passwords complex. Use a combination of numbers, symbols, and letters (uppercase and lowercase).
  3. Change your passwords regularly (every 45 to 90 days).
  4. Don’t share any of your user names, passwords, or other computer or website access codes.
  5. Only open emails or attachments from people you know.
  6. Never install or connect any personal software or hardware to your organization’s network or hardware without permission from your IT department.
  7. Make electronic and physical back-ups or copies of all your most important work.
  8. Report all suspicious or unusual problems with your computer to your IT department.

You can find additional cybersecurity publications on the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s website.

Mapping Global Cyber Threats: Attempts at cyber attacks occur 24/7 around the globe. You can watch some of these attempts in real-time here.

If you would like to share the steps your company is taking to handle cyber threats, please post them on TCT’s Facebook page.